• kixik@lemmy.ml
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      9 months ago

      Second one, which I’d rephrase as ubuntu sticking with apt/dpkg as its package manager. Which is really nice if you like ubuntu as a distro already.

      Though I don’t really get why there has to be a distro to be beaten. And having flavors is always good. I, for example, don’t like distros changing too much upstream SW, so the more vanilla the better. I don’t like either the periodic releases, and to be rolling release rocks. I don’t like systemd, whereas most distros now a days are systemd dependent. I also dislike network manager and similar and require a distro that keeps support for the basic dhcpcd + wpa_supplicant… All that to say, that no distro fits all needs, so several options are good, no need to have one beating the rest, :)

  • electric_nan@lemmy.ml
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    9 months ago

    It’s been my default choice for years now, and I’ve recently switched to the Debian-based version. Couldn’t be happier.

    • poinck@lemm.ee
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      9 months ago

      I never used a spin-off of a unique distribution of GNU/Linux on my own computer, except the dark Ubuntu times. It seemed right at the time.

      Now, I don’t see why I should recommend a distro that tries to be easier on new users when the original has sane defaults and is closer to upstream regarding all the tools and software bundled with it.

      Here are my recommendations for new users in that order (regardless of their computer knowledge): Debian, Fedora, Gentoo, Arch, Slackware, LFS. Friends can help with the installation and should consider easy maintainability when dealing with users who just want to use it.

      My personal preferences are Gentoo and Debian.

      • stella@lemm.ee
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        9 months ago

        I haven’t used Mint in years, but back in the day downstream distros from Debian often worked better for desktop users than Debian itself.

        This is because of Debian’s ‘stability’ philosophy. This meant that bugs could stick around for years in Debian stable after being fixed upstream.

        Of course, with each new stable release, there should be fewer bugs so this problem should become less over time.

        I’ve considered switching from Manjaro to Debian on my laptop, but then I think about how great the AUR is. That’s pretty much the main appeal for Manjaro over Debian, for me.

      • electric_nan@lemmy.ml
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        9 months ago

        Before switching to LMDE, I did try just using Debian with Cinnamon, thinking it would be pretty much the same experience. I did not really enjoy the experience. There were too many niceties missing that I had taken for granted with Mint. I wasn’t interested in spending my time hunting down all the tweaks and packages to make those changes.

        • poinck@lemm.ee
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          9 months ago

          Indeed, but what has this to do with my recommendation? ^^

          It clearly depends on what the new wants to get in to. Gentoo is a smart way to learn a lot while installing it. I mean it; this is no joke!

          • dino@discuss.tchncs.de
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            9 months ago

            Its common sense to learn new stuff going to most complex way. But enough sarcasm for today.

    • CalicoJack@lemmy.dbzer0.com
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      9 months ago

      I don’t use it myself, but it’s been my main recommendation for newbies for years for that reason. No complaints yet, even from the less tech-literate.

    • miss_brainfart@lemmy.ml
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      9 months ago

      A lot of distros work really well on my laptop, but Mint has always been the only one that works perfectly

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    9 months ago

    I think most mainstream distros have reached a point of diminishing returns, and that’s a good thing.

  • Lord Goose@lemmy.dbzer0.com
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    9 months ago

    I’ve been using Mint for a few months now after initially trying Fedora and Kubuntu. Mint has been by far my favorite experience and I’ve even gotten a few people converted to Linux via Mint. Definitely my recommendation for any Linux newbies.

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    9 months ago

    For a home user with recent hardware in my opinion the system to beat is openSUSE Tumbleweed. It is a stable and rolling distribution, that is, it has the best of both worlds.

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    9 months ago

    I’ve used Linux for over two decades (red hat to Gentoo to Ubuntu to arch) and I must say it’ll be a tough sell to get me back to an RPM or a debian based distro solely due to how god awfully slow the package managers (dpkg and rpm) are.

    Since Docker came along and brought with it the ride of Alpine and APK, it made me realize that system upgrades on a modern processor, fast internet, and an SSD should take seconds, not minutes.

    • Diplomjodler@feddit.de
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      9 months ago

      Mint is for people who just want stuff to work and not fiddle about too much. It does that very well. Anyone who simply wants an alternative to Windows that is easy to get into and use will be perfectly happy with it. If you want to customise everything to a t, Mint isn’t for you

      • 𝕃𝕒𝕞𝕓@lemmy.zip
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        9 months ago

        EndeavourOS is the most simple to work with distro I’ve had. Ubuntu-based and Fedora all were trouble. OpenSUSE was fine but I prefer terminal centric (not saying you cannot use terminal on it). EndeavourOS is amazing. I just yay to update and all works.

        • Yote.zip@pawb.social
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          9 months ago

          Arch is bleeding edge and frequently has minor bugs as a result. This is probably fine for power users and people who want to learn Linux but I wouldn’t give an Arch distro to someone who isn’t techy. They also likely won’t appreciate the frequent updates to applications that they depend on to actually do work.

          (I used Arch for almost five years and think it’s one of the best distros)

    • mindbleach@sh.itjust.works
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      9 months ago

      Low bullshit quotient. No sudden garbage.

      I switched when one guy unilaterally decided Ubuntu would completely flip its user interface, for no goddamn reason, the night before a long-term-support feature freeze.

    • Yote.zip@pawb.social
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      9 months ago

      It’s simple and solid enough to give to people who don’t know what they’re doing, and its Debian/Ubuntu base makes it flexible enough to not slow down power users who want to start modifying it. Other distros that might fit this bill keep shooting themselves in the foot and going off in weird directions, while Linux Mint has been a reputable no-BS distro for a very long time. It’s a workhorse distro without any gimmicks and that’s the point.

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      9 months ago

      Mint was my “gateway distro” to get away from windows as a daily driver. It still is my daily driver and it’s given me enough guardrails to not screw it up too badly and learn.

      I’m looking to go further up stream towards Debian. I’ve looked at arch and “arch that’s not allowed to be called arch because it has a gui installer”, but I’m not ready/able/“risk-tolerant-enough” to keep that stable as my daily driver. Fedora dormant seem quite right for me.

      I really like mint, it meets my needs, has treated me well.

      • CalicoJack@lemmy.dbzer0.com
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        From experience, ignore your instincts and give pure Arch a try. It’s a lot more stable than you’d think, and their wiki has very thorough instructions for everything.

        It’s a bit of a trial by fire on your terminal knowledge, but you’ll learn a ton in the process. Worst case, you get fed up trying and just go to Fedora or something after.

        • jackpot@lemmy.ml
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          9 months ago

          i dont have the energy or patience to go to a wiki for my OS, i just want it to work and not be proprietary. besides setting up wine staging and pipewire it’s generally been smooth sailing

          • confusedwiseman@lemmy.world
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            9 months ago

            I’m with you here, sometimes I’m really lazy and don’t want to mess with it. Other times I’m hell-bent on doing something I know how to do in a GUI through terminal.

            Mint has let me keep my system OS rock solid, and I’m not afraid to try about anything in the vm. Reinstall when time permits or just roll back to a snapshot.

            I’ve got time shift installed, but I use my computer for work, so there’s some draw to stability and having everything just work.

          • CaptDust@sh.itjust.works
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            9 months ago

            You can go to the wiki, or you can search random forums and stack overflow like normal when things go sideways 🤷‍♂️

        • LeFantome@programming.dev
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          9 months ago

          I would echo that but suggest going to EndevourOS. EOS is a lot easier to install for normal people. What you get is insanely close to pure Arch.

          I agree that running Arch is easier than people think. It is very stable. Also, because everything you could want is in the repositories ( and up-to-date ) it does not become a spaghetti like mess over time. No more third-party repos. No more PPAs.

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          9 months ago

          I’m sure it’d be fine, I’m probably not willing to put in the right amount of effort. I think a big fear for me is I use the computer for work, and while I have others, I prefer this one. I may not have the 15-30min to research and resolve something I did to myself.

          I also try not to be the person who asks for help on the same question for the 17th time.

          So far I’ve always been able to find answers in documentation or communities. Turns out I’m not so unique. ;).

        • confusedwiseman@lemmy.world
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          9 months ago

          Thanks for this recommendation as it’s potentially a logical step. I’ve thought about this but not researched it enough, yet. I don’t understand enough about the differences yet. Hypothetically, do I need or want Mint on Debian, or do I just want to get the real deal? Not posing the question to you, just what I’ve yet to research further. Mint is currently working fine for me, so there’s no rush.

          • HumanPerson@sh.itjust.works
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            9 months ago

            Going straight to Debian isn’t hard. LMDE might have newer packages, IDK. I used Debian 12 for a bit and still use it on my server. Mint offers a great stock experience but Debian has a hard to explain vanilla coolness if you will. I would also recommend considering OpenSUSE if you haven’t looked at it.

        • folkrav@lemmy.ca
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          9 months ago

          Has to be Manjaro or EndeavourOS. If they’re just getting their teeth in, my guess is on the former.

          • confusedwiseman@lemmy.world
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            9 months ago

            I looked at Manjaro VERY briefly, and I played with Endeavor a bit. I installed several distros as VMs just to poke around. I found Debian familiar which is likely the main reason I find myself leaning that way.

            • folkrav@lemmy.ca
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              I use Mint, PopOS, or Arch/EndeavourOS more or less interchangeably. I’ve sincerely never had any issues with Arch’s stability. The term “stable” when describing a distro refers more to the package versions than system stability or overall reliability. Things aren’t necessarily broken cause they’re more up to date. Back in 2020, my laptop didn’t play well with Ubuntu 20.04 because of some power management issue caused by a kernel bug. My only real option was getting off of LTS and switching to 20.10 which had a newer fixed kernel version. So in effect, the Ubuntu LTS was less “stable” for me because of them keeping the kernel version stable.

              YMMV, obviously, but most of what I’m doing when doing a fresh install is installing the packages I need, and configuring them. I can do this pretty much regardless of the distro. Most of the difference is if those packages are available in the first place, and how I’ll have to install them if they aren’t in the base repositories. Configs/dotfiles are usually pretty portable. The rest is just well… Linux as usual.

    • Gunpachi@lemmings.world
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      9 months ago

      It just works. Whenever anyone I know tells me they are going to install ubuntu or try out linux for the first time - I just tell them to install linux mint and they’ve had no complaints so far.

      (Even though I only use mint as a fallback distro, I really appreciate it being there)

    • TheGrandNagus@lemmy.world
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      9 months ago

      It’s reliable, customisable, everything is doable in a GUI, and has a Windows UX that people are familiar with.

  • Pantherina@feddit.de
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    9 months ago

    I too think Cinnamon is a pretty great Experience. I am using KDE and heard from many people that it feels better, its more unified and has way more features.

    Wayland is important for security, and Mint will need a long time to adopt that. There are already apps only running on Wayland for reasons.

    KDE is a bit unstable as its a huge project. I hope that will get better in Plasma 6.

    I sure wish to have something like KDE more stable. But once you are used to it, its just better. Things that are not there yet on Mint are on KDE since years.

    Its a bit of a mess as its so old. Extensions need to be cleaned up. But like, Dolphin extensions are so great, I dont know an equivalent on Cinnamon.

    Also the distro model is the standard one. A Fedora Atomic Cinnamon variant, with modern presets and everything working, would be a great thing to install anywhere. Automatic atomic updates, easy version upgrades, transparent system changes and resets being just one command away.

    • stella@lemm.ee
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      9 months ago

      Cinnamon is more unified, but I don’t think any DE has as many features as KDE.

    • comicallycluttered@beehaw.org
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      9 months ago

      You can get a Cinnamon image via U-Blue.

      U-Blue in general is a nice collection of images because not only are there various unofficial options, but a lot of things like RPMFusion, etc. are preconfigured in their versions of the main editions (SilverBlue, Kinoite, Sericea, Onyx).

      Or you can just rebase regular SilverBlue (or one of the three other official variants) to one of those images if you’re running it already. Can roll back if you don’t like it.

      I doubt there’ll be an official edition until Cinnamon has full Wayland support since Fedora is going all in on that now.

      In the meantime, the community has it covered.

      • Pantherina@feddit.de
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        9 months ago

        Right! I have to try that.

        Personally I dont care for cinnamon, but it is easy for users and ublue is great.

        My personal wishlists are a Fedora-based TV OS, a hardened version and a rawhide kde 6 one

  • Sh1ft@feddit.de
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    9 months ago

    I have used some distros by now and I do love mint. But a few years back every major upgrade of mint lead to bugs and me reinstalling my system. So far the only Distro i tried that just keeps working is MX Linux on my old laptop.

    Because I want to get rid of windows I installed Nobara. I love to play games. I works pretty good, but since only one guy ist maintaining it, it should be not considered a daily driver.

    I am still not happy because it dont want to switch between distros for gaming and working.

    • woelkchen@lemmy.world
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      9 months ago

      Because I want to get rid of windows I installed Nobara. I love to play games. I works pretty good, but since only one guy ist maintaining it, it should be not considered a daily driver.

      Nobara is just a Fedora remix. I’ve used another remix a bunch of years ago and converting that to a regular Fedora installation after its maintainer left was just removing that addon repo and letting dnf handle the rest. I think I only needed to switch to Fedora’s branding packages.